This 5-day comprehensive leadership program covers communication skills, resolving conflict, time management, and leadership.

Prerequisites

Completion of the course assessments for this program are recommended.

Objectives

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • describe the communication process.
  • apply listening skills.
  • identify factors that influence communication.
  • use communication tools.
  • manage and resolve conflict.
  • communicate in the workplace.
  • allocate time.
  • prioritize time.
  • analyze, plan, and schedule time.
  • avoid procrastination.
  • manage interruptions and information flow.
  • use time management tools.
  • define leadership.
  • identify effective leadership behavior.
  • apply ethical leadership.
  • manage change.
  • apply leadership power.
  • set goals.

 

Course content

 

Understanding the Communication Process

 

The Goal of Effective Communication

The Importance of Effective Communication

How Communication Works

The Process

Communication Networks

Eliminating Barriers

Listening Skills

Introducing Listening Skills

Active Listening

Re-examining Your Listening Skills

Empathetic Listening

Using Questions

The Role of Silence

Interpreting Responses

Recognizing Individual Sensory Modes

Understanding Influencing Factors

Identifying Influencing Factors

Minimizing Assumptions and Preconceptions

Minimizing Prejudices

Understanding the Situation or Environment

Using Communication Tools

Understanding Delivery Methods

Selecting Words

Using Tone and Sincerity

Using Body Language

Selecting the Correct Channel

 

Managing and Resolving Conflict

Understanding Conflict

Types of Conflict

Stages of Conflict

Identifying Factors That Promote Conflict

Poor Communication

Low Associate Morale

Individual Associate Concerns

Environmental Stresses

Diversity Issues

Using Constructive Ways to Manage Conflict

Responding vs. Reacting

Separating People from Problems

Coping Strategies

Conflict Handling Intentions

Negotiation and Bargaining

Personal Inventory: Conflict Management Style

Applying Conflict Management Tools

Tips for Controlling Emotions

Defenses Against Verbal Attacks

Handling Routine Hassles

Dealing with Anger and Aggression

Managing Intense Personality Types

Unit Activities

Role Play: Managing Difficult Situations

 

Communicating in the Workplace

Writing Effective Sentences

Placing Modifiers

Using Active Voice

Combining Sentences

Proofreading

Proofreading Suggestions

Using Telephone and Voice Mail Etiquette

Placing Calls

Answering Calls

Using Voice Mail

Using E-mail Etiquette

Understanding E-mail Guidelines

Resolving Employee Complaints

Understanding Effective Complaint Resolution Processes

Examining How You Currently Allocate Your Time

Your Week at a Glance

Identifying Individual Time Wasters

Common Time Wasters

Time Wasters or Long-Term Investments? Some Useful Techniques for Managing Interaction

Prioritizing Your Time

Deciding What Your Priorities Should Be – And Why

Begin with Your Job Description

Open the Time Window

Putting Your Money Where Your Time Is

What Have You Learned?

Making the Match

Analyzing, Planning, and Scheduling Your Time

Common Analysis and Planning Techniques

For Your Review

Unit Activities

Case Study: Analyzing and Planning a Customer Service Project

Avoiding Procrastination

Recognizing the Results of Procrastination

Common Strategies to Avoid Procrastinating

Managing Interruptions and Information Flow

Organizing Your Environment

Handling Mail and Memos

Handling E-Mail

Handling Interruptions

Putting Your Phone on Voice Mail

Set Expectations

Close the Door

State the Consequences of Interruptions

Handling Meetings

Using Time Management Tools

Introduction to Time Management Tools

“Sensing” Time

Planning and Scheduling Strategy

Monthly Planning and Scheduling

Weekly Planning and Scheduling

Daily Planning and Scheduling

Defining Leadership

Defining Leadership as an Ability and a Process

Understanding the Leadership Cycle

Understanding Effective Leadership Behavior

Understanding Leader Traits

Drive

Desire to Lead

Honesty and Integrity

Self-Confidence

Cognitive Ability

Knowledge of the Business

Understanding Leader Tasks

Envisioning Goals

Affirming Values

Motivating

Maintaining Positive Attitudes

Restoring Confidence

Managing

Achieving Unity Among Workgroups

Providing Explanations

Advocating Renewal

Serving as a Symbol

Representing the Group

Applying Ethical Leadership

Understanding Leader Motives

Operating Within Legal Boundaries

Considering Economic and Social Pressure

Meeting Self-Interest

Recognizing and Communicating the Ethics of a

Problem

Eliminating Rationalization

Displaying Respect for Others

Defining Personal Worth with Ethical Behavior

For Your Review

Unit Activities

Understanding Ethical Leadership Behavior

Understanding Change

Creating a Mission Statement

Components

Distinguishing Between Frame-bending Changes and Frame-breaking Changes

Frame-bending Changes

Frame-breaking Changes

Restructuring an Organization

External Factors

Internal Factors

Communicating and Implementing Restructuring

Reaffirming Core Values

Managing Change

Applying Leadership Power

Using Power to Your Advantage

Referent Power

Expert Power

Reward Power

Coercive Power

Legitimate Power

Selecting Different Power Types

Sources of Power

Developing Relationships

Using and Building Interpersonal Skills

Establishing a Good Reputation and Past

Performance History

Increasing Knowledge, Skills, and Information

Controlling Resources

Setting Goals

Applying Basic Goal-Setting Principles

Setting Difficult and Attainable Goals

Setting Specific Goals

Encouraging Participation

Providing Periodic Feedback

Types of Goal Setting

Targeted

Overall

Measuring Goals

Using a Single Productivity Index

Setting Goals for Individual Performance Aspects

Assigning Points to Output Levels

Determining a Time Period

Reviewing Goals Each Period

Implementing a Goal-Setting System

Managing Resistance

Minimizing Distortion

Involving Management

Reporting Positive and Negative Feedback

Revising the Goal-Setting System

For Your Review

Unit Activities

Designing a Goal-Setting System

 

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • Recognize how anger affects your body, your mind, and your behavior
  • Understand the causes of anger, the buttons and triggers that get you angry
  • Look at the behaviors that are disguises for anger and how to deal with these
  • Identify ways to help other people safely manage some of their repressed or expressed anger

 

Course Content

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Understanding Anger

  • Defining Anger
  • The Costs of Anger
  • The Benefits of Anger
  • Skills for Success

 The Causes of Anger

  • Buttons and Triggers
  • Precipitating Factors
  • Distorted Thinking
  • Miscommunication

Understanding Behavior Types

  • Behavior Types Abound
  • Passive Behavior
  • Manipulative Behavior
  • Assertive Behavior
  • Aggressive Behavior
  • Passive-Aggressive Behavior

Using Coping Tools

  • Managing Reactions
  • Starting an Anger Log
  • Relaxation Techniques
  • Coping Thoughts
  • Using Humor
  • A Model of Release

Communication Skills

  • Listening Skills
  • Asking Questions
  • Moving Forward
  • Solving Problems
  • Assertiveness

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s no secret. Employees who feel they are valued and recognized for the work they do are more motivated, responsible, and productive. This workshop will help supervisors and managers create a more dynamic, loyal, and energized workplace. It is designed specifically to help busy managers and supervisors understand what employees want, and to give them a starting point for creating champions.

 

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • What motivation is
  • Common motivational theories and how to apply them
  • About the carrot, the whip, and the plant
  • How fear and desire affect employee motivation
  • Ways to create a motivational climate and design a motivating job

 

Course Content

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

 

What is Motivation?

To begin, participants will explore motivation through a fun activity.

 

Supervising and Motivation

Next, we will look at three everyday objects that represent three approaches to motivation: the carrot, the whip, and the plant.

 

Motivational Theories

During this session, participants will explore Maslow’s and Herzberg’s theories of motivation.

 

Fear and Desire

For the pre-assignment, participants were asked to answer some personal questions about motivation. During this session, they will discuss their responses.

 

Setting Goals

Goal setting is an important part of motivation. This session will look at a SMART way of setting goals.

 

The Role of Values

During this session, participants will explore their feelings about various motivational factors.

 

Creating a Motivational Climate

This session will look at the reinforcement theory, also called the behavioral theory, of motivation.

 

Expectancy Theory

Next, participants will learn about the expectancy theory through a fun exercise and group discussion.

 

Applying Your Skills

During this session, participants will work on several motivational case studies.

 

Designing Motivating Jobs

This session will explore methods of designing (or redesigning) motivating jobs.

 

A Motivational Checklist

To wrap up the day, we will look at the ten things you can do to motivate employees on a daily basis.

 

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

 

 

Why is it that some people find it easy to solve tough problems with simple solutions while others find this feat nearly impossible? You’ve no doubt looked at solutions to problems and said, “I should have thought of that.” But you didn’t. The answer is not just creativity, although that certainly helps. Rather, the power to find these creative solutions lies in our ability to search for and find facts that relate to the situation, and put them together in ways that work. As an individual, facts and knowledge can only go so far. By tapping into the knowledge of others (staff, colleagues, family, or friends), anyone can expand the range of solutions available. This two-day workshop will help you teach participants how to do just that.

 

Objectives

Workshop topics include ways to:

  • Increase awareness of problem solving steps and problem solving tools.
  • Distinguish root causes from symptoms to identify the right solution for the right problem.
  • Improve problem solving and decision making skills by identifying individual problem solving styles.
  • Think creatively and work towards creative solutions.
  • Recognize the top ten rules of good decision-making.

 

 

Course Content

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

 

What is Problem Solving?

To begin, participants will explore just what problem solving and decision making means. We will also look at different types of decisions, the difference between facts and information, and common decision making traps.

 

Problem Solving Styles

This session will explore the four types of problem solvers. Then, participants will work in small groups to identify their strengths and weaknesses, and how to use that knowledge to become better problem solvers.

Earthquake!

This hour long exercise will ask participants to imagine that they are in a crisis situation. It will give them a framework to solve the problem and make decisions.

 

The Problem Solving Model

During this session, participants will learn about a three-phase model that they can apply to most problems. They will also have an opportunity to apply the model to two situations.

 

Six Ways to Approach a Decision

Next, participants will learn about Edward DeBono’s six thinking hats, and they will practice using the hats during a problem solving discussion.

 

The Problem Solving Toolkit

This session will look at eleven basic problem solving tools and two advanced tools (the gradients of agreement and fishbone analysis). Then, participants will apply these tools to a case study in a large group discussion.

 

Thinking Outside the Box

Participants will discuss ways to encourage creative thinking, including brainstorming and the random word method.

 

Decision Making Case Study

The afternoon of Day Two will be spent working on problems with the Peerless Data Corp. Participants will work in small groups to solve five different problems, and will be rewarded based on the quality of their decisions.

 

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

 

 

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • How to use the rules of likeability to their advantage
  • The seven influences in forming relationships
  • The Johari Window
  • Some of Dale Carnegie’s key ideas
  • How to communicate more effectively
  • How to network

Course Content

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

 

How to Get People to Like You

Participants will examine the twelve rules of likability in small groups. Then, the large group will reconvene and discuss its conclusions.

 

What Influences People in Forming Relationships?

There are seven main things that influence people in forming relationships. During this session, we will cover what those influences are and how participants can ensure they are a positive factor in your relationships.

 

Disclosure

Joe Luft and Harry Ingraham developed the Johari Window, a way of looking at our self-awareness and our ability to ask feedback of others. We will look at the Johari Window in detail during this session.

 

How to Win Friends and Influence People

One of the most popular books ever written was Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People. We will spend this session looking at some of its tips.

 

Communication Skills for Relationship Selling

The two most basic elements of good communication are asking questions and listening to others. We will cover both skills in depth during this session.

 

Non-Verbal Messages

Did you know that your words convey only 7% of your message? We’ll discuss what the other 93% is made up of, and how you can ensure that your body is sending the same message as your words.

 

Managing the Mingling

During this session, we will discuss some tips on mingling, including ways to remember peoples’ names.

 

The Handshake

During the important first few minutes of a new relationship, a handshake is usually the only body contact between two people. We will discuss and demonstrate the five key elements of a good handshake.

 

Small Talk

Being able to small-talk successfully is one of the most crucial skills a businessperson can develop, but it’s also one of the hardest. We’ll discuss some basic do’s and don’ts of small talk.

 

Networking

Once you have started a network of business associates, how do you organize your contacts? We will answer this question to wrap up the day.

 

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

 

Pre-requisites

  • None

     

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • Accept there are no normal or abnormal ways of reacting to change, but that we must start from where we are.
  • See change not as something to be feared and resisted but as an essential element of the world to be accepted.
  • Understand that adapting to change is not technical but attitudinal. Change is not an intellectual issue but one that strikes at who you are.
  • Recognize that before we can embrace the way things will be, we must go through a process of grieving, and of letting go of the way things used to be.
  • See change as an opportunity for self-motivation and innovation.
  • Identify strategies for helping change be accepted and implemented in the workplace.

 

Course contents

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

 

What is Change?

To begin the day, we will discuss some basics of change, including definitions and examples.

 

The Change Cycle

During this session, we will explore the three phases of William Bridges’ change cycle through lecture and small group work.

 

The Human Reaction to Change

This session will look at Daryl Conner’s interpretation of the human response to change through lecture and small group work.

 

The Pace of Change

We will look at how different people react to change in different ways and at different times through a lecture and a case study.

 

The Pyramid Response to Change

We will examine how employees, middle management, and upper management are affected by change.

 

A Four Room Apartment

This session will look at change using Claes Janssen’s four room apartment model.

 

Dealing with Resistance

During this session, we will examine the three keys to successful change.

 

Adapting to Change

This session will discuss how to become resilient to change through a lecture, personal case studies, and small group discussion.

 

Strategies for Dealing with Change

Now that we have looked at change using a number of models, we will look at five strategies that can help you deal with change.

 

Managing Anger

Change often makes people feel angry. We will look at some ways of dealing with our own anger and the anger of others through lecture and small group work.

 

Managing Stress

Change can also make people feel stressed. During this session, we will look at some stress management and relaxation techniques.

 

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

 

 

Pre-requisites

  • None

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • Use coaching to develop their team
  • Develop the coaching skills that help improve individual performance
  • Demonstrate the behaviors and practices of an effective coach
  • Recognize employees’ strengths and give them the feedback they need to succeed
  • Identify employee problems and ways you can help to correct them

 

Course contents

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

 

Defining Coaching

The first part of the morning will be spent exploring what coaching means (in general and to participants), reviewing coaching skills, and evaluating the pre-assignment.

 

Interpersonal Communication Skills

Communicating well is a key aspect of successful coaching. During this session, participants will explore different communication skills and create an action plan.

 

Self-Disclosure

Joe Luft and Harry Ingraham developed the Johari windows concept, a way of looking at our self-awareness and our ability to ask feedback of others. This session will look at the window and examine how we can use it when coaching.

 

Critical Coaching Skills

Participants will examine important coaching skills in small groups, including helping, mentoring, teaching, and challenging skills.

 

More on Communication

This lecturette will examine two powerful, simple coaching tools: asking questions and listening

 

Learning Styles and Principles

We learn in three different ways: by seeing, by hearing, and by doing. In a large group discussion, participants will identify ways to incorporate these methods into coaching.

 

Benefits/Consequences

During this session, we will examine a tool that coaches can use to help gain buy-in for change from employees.

 

Skills Involved in Coaching

Participants will work in small groups to complete a mix-and-match exercise that will familiarize them with key coaching skills.

 

The Coaching Model

This session will explore a four-step coaching model that can be applied to any situation.

 

Feedback

Feedback is an essential component of coaching. You will discuss types of feedback and offer some tips in lecture format during this session.

 

Coaching Problems

To wrap up the day, participants will examine case studies and offer solutions.

 

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

Speaking under pressure, or thinking on your feet, is based on being able to quickly organize your thoughts and ideas, and then being able to convey them meaningfully to your audience to modify their attitudes or behavior. It applies to formal speeches as well as everyday business situations. This two-day course is aimed at teaching participants some new techniques which will give them the persuasive edge when they are making a presentation, fielding difficult questions, or presenting complex information.

Pre-requisites

  • None

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • Quick and easy preparation methods – whether you have one minute or one week to prepare.
  • What you can do to prepare for questions before you know what those questions will be.
  • How you can overcome the nerves that you may have when speaking in front of a group, particularly if the group is not sympathetic to what you have to say.
  • Presentation techniques that establish your credibility and get people on your side.

Course contents

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

Getting Started

To begin, we will explore what Speaking Under Pressure is. Participants will also learn an easy way to structure any presentation.

Planning

This session will offer participants seven easy ways to prepare for a presentation – even if you don’t know the time, date, or topic.

Force Field Analysis

Next, participants will learn about a structured method of looking at two opposing forces acting on a situation.

Understanding Your Audience

During this session, we will explore a three-phase needs approach. Participants will also practice creating an audience profile.

Controlling Your Jitters

This session will focus on how to make the most of stage fright.

Making Your Listener Hear You

During this session, participants will explore what turns listeners on and off in a large group discussion. We will also take a brief look at non-verbal communication.

Key Themes

To wrap up the first day, participants will learn what a key theme is and how to create one and distill it into a key sentence. Participants will also be given a small homework assignment.

Key Sentences

To begin the second day, we’ll wrap up our discussion on key themes and participants will share their homework assignment.

A Plan to Structure Ideas

This session will focus on a three part plan (Aim, Concentrate, and Adapt) that participants can use to structure the body of their presentation.

Organization Methods

Next, participants will learn some different ways to organize the information in the body of their message.

Our Body Language

During this session, participants will take a close look at positive and negative body messages.

If You Could Be…

To prepare for the major presentation later on in the workshop, participants will be asked to give a short presentation on this question: “If you could wake up tomorrow having gained any one ability or quality, what would it be?”

Beginnings and Endings

This session will give participants some ways to create strong beginnings and endings.

Expanding a Basic Plan

So far, this workshop has focused on small presentations. This session will give participants some tips on fleshing out those small presentations should they be required to present something longer than just a few minutes.

Presentations

To conclude the workshop, participants will prepare and present a short five minute speech. Participants will also evaluate each other.

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.

A great presenter has two unique qualities: appropriate skills and personal confidence. This confidence comes from knowing what you want to say and being comfortable with your communication skills. In this two day workshop, participants will master the skills that will make them a better speaker and presenter.

Pre-requisites

  • None

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • Gain rapport with your audience
  • Reduce nervousness and fear
  • Recognize how visual aids can create impact and attention
  • Create a professional presence
  • Prepare and organize information in different ways

Course contents

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

 

Communication

To begin, participants will explore key communication skills, including how to start and end a conversation.

 

Edit Your Conversation

Next, participants will learn about characteristics that can make or break the audience’s impression of a speaker, including volume, clichés, slang, diction, jargon, and tact (or lack thereof).

 

Appropriately Sharing Yourself with Others

During this session, participants will discuss self disclosure using the Johari window.

 

Trust

This session will explore the idea of trust and how self disclosure can help build relationships.

 

Positive Self-Talk

During this session, participants will learn how to build their self-confidence – a key skill for any public speaker.

 

Making the Most of Meetings

Meetings are a central part of communication and cooperation within any organization. This session will give participants some ways to successfully prepare for and present at any meeting.

 

Body Language

During this session, participants will learn some ways to make sure their body language is sending the right message.

 

Sticky Situations

This session will give participants some tools to deal with uncomfortable situations.

 

Why Talk?

Next, participants will explore the value of oral presentations.

 

Planning Your Presentation

During this session, participants will learn how to use PAFEO to plan their presentation.

 

Overcoming Nervousness

To conclude the first day, we will look at some suggestions about delivery.

 

The STARR Pattern

To begin the second day, participants will learn a second way of organizing their presentation: the STARR pattern.

 

Objectives

Specific learning objectives include:

  • Start developing an office code of ethics
  • Avoid ethical dilemmas
  • Use tools to help them make better decisions
  • Deal with common ethical dilemmas
  • Understand the difference between ethics and morals
  • Understand the value of ethics

Course contents

Introduction and Course Overview

You will spend the first part of the day getting to know participants and discussing what will take place during the workshop. Students will also have an opportunity to identify their personal learning objectives.

 

What is Ethics?

To start the day, we will discuss what the words “ethics” and “morals” mean. Participants will also have an opportunity to identify some of their personal values.

 

Taking Your Moral Temperature, Part One

Before we begin discussing how to make good decisions, students will be asked to think about how they would respond to some sticky situations.

Why Bother with Ethics?

During this session, we will look at some of the payoffs of ethical behavior.

Kohlberg’s Six Stages

This session will explore Kohlberg’s six stages of moral development through a lecture and a small group exercise.

 

Some Objective Ways of Looking at the World

We will look at some classic philosophical approaches to problems during this session, including the golden rule, utilitarianism, and the categorical imperative. Participants will also apply these approaches to some hypothetical situations.

 

What Does Ethical Mean?

What seems to be the ethical choice can differ depending on what side of the dilemma you’re on. To illustrate this, we will look at the case of Merck Pharmaceuticals in a lecture and in small groups.

 

Avoiding Ethical Dilemmas

This session will examine some ways that we can avoid getting stuck in ethical dilemmas. Then, participants will apply the methods to a case study.

 

Pitfalls and Excuses

We can always find excuses to make the wrong decision. This session will look at some of the most common reasons for bad decisions and offer some thinking points.

Developing an Office Code of Ethics

This session will look at what a code of ethics should contain, how to determine if your company is ready for a code, and some sample codes of ethics.

 

22 Keys to an Ethical Office

Ethics expert Nan DeMars has identified 22 keys to help make your office ethical. We will review these keys in a lecture, and then participants will be asked to identify some ways to use the ideas to help resolve areas of ethical concern in their office.

 

Basic Decision Making Tools

This session will look at a basic three-phase problem solving model and some problem solving tools.

 

Ethical Decision Making Tools

In addition to the basic problem solving tools covered in the previous session, there are some special tools that you can use to solve ethical problems. We will discuss some basic tools (such as the smell test and the shoe test) and some advanced tools (such as the Potter box and the Kidder process).

Dilemmas with Company Policy

It is possible that your company’s policies will place you in an ethical dilemma. This session will look at some things that you can do if this happens.

Dilemmas with Co-Workers

During this session, we will look at some ethical dilemmas that co-workers can create. First, we will discuss some basic tips in a lecture, and then participants will complete a case study.

 

Dilemmas with Clients

Clients can sometimes request that we do something unethical for a number of reasons. This session will examine some of the most common reasons. Then, participants will role play some possible scenarios.

 

Dilemmas and Supervisors

This session will cover some dilemmas you might encounter as a supervisor, and some dilemmas that supervisors might put you in.

What to do When You Make a Mistake

Let’s face the truth: we’re all human. We all make mistakes and make decisions that we wish we could take back. This session will examine Nan DeMars’ six-step plan for recovering from mistakes gracefully.

Taking Your Moral Temperature, Part Two

At the beginning of the workshop, participants were asked to think about how they would handle some sticky situations. Participants will now be asked to re-evaluate their decisions in light of everything they have learned.

 

Workshop Wrap-Up

At the end of the day, students will have an opportunity to ask questions and fill out an action plan.